Safety Protocols for Shifting from Office to Home – Occupational Health and Safety

Safety Protocols for Shifting from Office to Home

Safety Protocols for Shifting from Office to Home

Although staff no longer must make the commute into the office, safety hazards can and do still exist in the home. Here’s your WFH safety checklist.

A substantial share of the US workforce is currently working from home to respect social distancing and to stop the spread of COVID-19. For some organizations, the transition from corporate office to home office has not been overly difficult. For other industries, remote work is accompanied with a large number of challenges, and the transition from office to home has not been as smooth.

As companies continue to navigate and overcome their own individual obstacles, it’s important that safety is not brushed aside. Although staff no longer must make the commute into the office, safety hazards can and do still exist in the home.

As some states and provinces in North America ease restrictions and begin to re-open, some offices will continue to work from home. Companies such as Facebook, Twitter, and Google are in no rush to bring their employees back to the physical office. Thus, this article will identify safety protocols to take for employers and employees who employ a remote workforce.

Set Up a Safe and Comfortable Work Environment

It’s important to dedicate adequate time and resources to set up a suitable at-home office due to the large amount of time that you will be spending here. Some important aspects to consider are chair and desk design, lighting, privacy and air flow. Investing in an ergonomic chair is a very good idea, specifically one with adjustable backrest, armrest and seat depth.

Conduct Regular At-Home Hazard Assessments

Before settling into your home office, it’s important to carry out an at-home hazard assessment to identify the safety risks that may be present. There is a broad range of hazards that can exist in the home, including ergonomic, physical, chemical, biological, environmental and electrical hazards.

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Author: HOCAdmin